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Credentialing through the Society
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The process for completing coursework toward a credential involves a combination of cohort based and individual learning, guided by course providers.  Initial credentialing includes:

Certified Process Consultant™ (CPC) - effective three years at a time

  • Three years related vocational experience with résumé on file
  • Bachelor's degree or proven equivalent
  • Completion of the Process Consultation 101 Course (earns 10 points)
  • Business mentoring, provided through the course, by an Executive Process Consultant (EPC); current commitment of two 30-60 minute phone calls or video conferences during the 12-week course
  • 10 points accumulated every three years to maintain the credential

Advanced Process Consultant™ (APC) - effective four years at a time

  • Previous earning of CPC status
  • Five years of vocational experience with documentation on file
  • Service to 10 clients with documentation on file OR 10 distinct projects with 5 clients
  • Completion of the Process Consultation 201 course (earns 10 points)
  • 10 points accumulated every four years to maintain the credential


Executive Process Consultant (EPC) - effective five years at a time

  • Previous earning of APC status
  • Seven years of vocational experience with documentation on file
  • Service to 20 clients with documentation on file
  • Recommendation from 1 course instructor OR 1 client, with letter on file
  • Completion of the Process Consultation 301 Case Study Lab (in-person event) (earns 10 points)
  • Completion of an integration paper or portfolio that is expertise-specific (earns 5 points)
  • 10 points accumulated every five years to maintain the credential
  • EPCs can serve as instructors and mentors for people pursuing a credential

 

These terms will be reviewed on an annual basis, and are subject to minor modification. The Society will communicate changes through its Standards and Ethics committee with fair and reasonable notice so that credential-seekers can plan accordingly.